Can Ritonavir Boosted Fosamprenavir Lead to a Cure for AIDS?


reduce transmission of the HIV virus 100 percentThe recent headlines proclaiming a cure for a Mississippi baby who had been exposed to the HIV virus which causes AIDS have captivated the world. This child was born to an HIV positive mother who had not received any prenatal care to reduce the transmission of the virus. Dr. Hannah Gay, who treated the baby, did not have an opportunity to treat the infected mother with anti-HIV medications, as is usually protocol for physicians. Due to the essence of time, Dr. Gay decided to aggressively fight off the virus by hitting it hard with a three drug regimen as early as 30 hours after birth.  Following the intense administration of these drugs, the virus levels in the baby began to drop, and were virtually undetectable at the one month mark. The baby continued with an AIDS cocktail treatment for the following 18 months, and now at a little over two years old this child is AIDS free. There are no signs of antibodies to the AIDS virus detectable in this toddler. Was the advent of this aggressive treatment the cause of an apparent cure? Researchers are intensely examining this very real possibility.

Despite this miraculous news, there is a great amount of good news already on the home front for treating pregnant women with AIDS. A recent study published in The Journal of Acquired Deficiency Syndrome on January 10, 2013,  touted the successful treatment of ritonavir boosted fosamprenavir (FPV/RTV) in pregnant women, particularly those women in their second trimester, third trimester and postpartum. When compared to the postpartum levels of amprenavir, which is the active metabolite for fosamprenavir, plasma concentration-time curves were 35% lower in the second trimester and 25% lower in the third trimester for the women who received FPV/RTV.

fosamprenavirResearch gleaned over the past decade indicates that it is possible to reduce transmission of the HIV virus from mother to child by close to 100 percent if acted upon timely with proper treatments. Doctors usually administer infected mothers anti-HIV drugs weeks or even months before they give birth, as well as during labor. Many medications are also continued for the first six weeks of life of an infant as well. Even the initiation of anti-AIDS drugs during labor can notably lower the risk of transmitting the virus.  Fosamprenavir is the latest heralded medication, as mentioned in the above study, to safely and tolerably treat a newborn facing transmission of AIDS from his mother. The patent for fosamprenavir, also known as the brand name Lexiva, manufactured by ViiV Healthcare expires on December 24, 2017, paving the way for generic formulations of this formidable medication. Current dosages of fosamprenavir, which need to be used in conjunction with other AIDS medications are approved in three different dosages by the FDA:  Two 700 milligram tablets twice daily; Two 700 milligram tablets in combination with one or two100 milligram capsules of Norvir once daily; or One 700 milligram tablet in combination with one 100 milligram capsule of Norvir twice daily. Clinical trials have revealed fosamprenavir (Lexiva) to be safe and efficacious when combined with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, such as ritonavir (Norvir). Fosamprenavir is also shown to be an effectual option for both people who are beginning HIV treatment for the first time and those who have tried and not found success with other protease inhibitors in previous treatments. LGM Pharma offers API Fosamprenavir CAS# 226700-79-4 for research and development purposes. Clients can be assured of quality products and continuous support throughout the R&D process.

Products currently covered by valid US Patents are offered for R&D use in accordance with 35 USC 271(e)+A13(1). Any patent infringement and resulting liability is solely at buyer risk.

  • Share: